Atlas Shrugged

Free Objectivist Books

It’s September 2, Atlas Shrugged Day. What better way to celebrate than by giving a copy to a student who wants to read it?

Right now on Free Objectivist Books, there are over 120 students looking for donors to send them copies of Atlas Shrugged, The Fountainhead, and other Objectivist books. A few minutes and a few dollars can put a copy in their hands.

In case you haven’t heard of Free Objectivist Books, it’s a website for the purpose of giving away copies of Objectivist books to students who want to read them. Students sign up with their name and school, and say what book they want to read and why. Donors choose which students they want to sponsor, and then send them the books directly. As a donor, you’ll get a personal thank-you from the student, and when they finish reading the book, you’ll get to hear their reaction. It’s a simple, easy, direct form of activism that is unusually motivating and rewarding.

Sign up to donate today at freeobjectivistbooks.org.

Our First Times Reading Atlas Shrugged

This video is a wonderful discussion between two Ayn Rand scholars — professors Ben Bayer and Greg Salmeiri — each warmly reminiscing about the first time they read Ayn Rand’s epic novel, Atlas Shrugged.

The video is to kick off the launch of The Atlas Shrugged Project — an eight-month, chapter-by-chapter, online discussion of Ayn Rand’s bestselling novel, Atlas Shrugged. To facilitate the discussion, ARI will host a weekly interactive broadcast on Facebook Live led by experienced teachers to help readers explore the intricate plot and abstract themes of Rand’s most philosophical novel.

CONNECT TO THE ATLAS PROJECT ON FACEBOOK
https://www.facebook.com/groups/AtlasProject/

 

The Atlas Shrugged Project: A Grand Esthetic Experience

The Ayn Rand Institute invites everyone to join The Atlas Project, an eight-month, chapter-by-chapter, online discussion of Atlas Shrugged. To facilitate the discussion, ARI will host a weekly interactive broadcast on Facebook Live led by experienced teachers to help readers explore the intricate plot and abstract themes of Rand’s most philosophical novel.